How to Find HIV Treatment Services

Key Points

  • If you are living with HIV, there are resources that can help you find a health care provider, pay for your medicines, locate affordable housing, and get help with mental health issues.
  • The Ryan White HIV/AIDS program is a federal program designed to help people with HIV get the medical care and other support services they need. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) explains who is eligible for Ryan White Program services and where to find help on their website: Get HIV Care and Treatment.
  • The Service Locator from AIDS.gov can help you locate HIV testing centers, mental health and family planning services, medical centers participating in the Ryan White Program, housing assistance, and substance abuse treatment resources in your area.

 

How do I find a health care provider?

Health care providers are an essential part of successful HIV treatment. They prescribe medicines to treat HIV and other conditions, order tests to monitor their patients’ health, and answer any health-related questions you may have.

Explore the resources below to get help finding a health care provider:

  • State HIV/AIDS Hotlines, from HRSA
    If you need help finding a health care provider or referrals for treatment services in your area, call your state’s HIV/AIDS hotline. The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) maintains a list of HIV/AIDS hotlines for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico.
  • Find Ryan White HIV/AIDS Medical Care Providers, from HRSA
    The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program can give people living with HIV access to the care they need when they do not have sufficient health insurance or are in need of financial assistance. This searchable database from HRSA locates health care services that participate in the Ryan White Program. You can also find federally funded health centers through HRSA’s mobile apps.
  • AIDS.gov Service Locator
    This database from AIDS.gov can help you locate HIV testing centers, mental health and family planning services, medical centers participating in the Ryan White Program, housing assistance, and substance abuse treatment facilities in your area.

 

Where can I get help paying for my HIV medicines?

HIV is treated with a daily combination of HIV medicines (called an HIV regimen) that keeps the virus from multiplying in the body. These medicines can’t cure HIV, so people living with HIV must continue taking HIV medicines throughout their lives.

There are several resources that can help people with HIV get the medicines they need:

  • ADAP Directory, from the ADAP Advocacy Association
    AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) make HIV medicines and other services available to people who are living with HIV and do not have sufficient health insurance or are in need of financial assistance. The ADAP Directory collects current ADAP-related information from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and several U.S. territories in a searchable database.
  • NASTAD Member Database
    Use the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors’ (NASTAD) directory to find health care specialists involved with ADAPs in your state.
  • Social Security for People Living with HIV/AIDS, from the Social Security Administration
    People with HIV who can’t work may qualify for disability benefits. This fact sheet explains who qualifies for those benefits and how to file for them.
  • Drug Companies
    Some companies that make HIV medicines also provide support programs for people who need those medicines. Find the contact information for drug companies by searching the drug’s name in the AIDSinfo Drug Database and then scrolling to the section in the patient version of the record titled "Manufacturer Information."

 

Where can I find housing assistance?

A stable living situation makes it easier for people with HIV to keep appointments with their health care provider and stick to an HIV regimen.

HIV/AIDS Housing, from HUD
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) manages the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) program, which is designed to provide housing assistance to people living with HIV. On HUD’s website, you can find housing resources for renters and homeowners, as well as for those without homes. You can also use the HUD Resource Locator to search for affordable and special needs housing near you.

 

How do I get help with mental health issues?

Anyone can have problems with mental health, but people with HIV are more likely to experience conditions like depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and insomnia than people without HIV. Read the AIDSinfo HIV and Mental Health fact sheet for more information.

Below are some places to find mental health treatment services:

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
    SAMSHA is a U.S. government agency that offers resources for those looking for help with mental health or substance abuse and addiction. SAMHSA’s Behavioral Health Treatment Services Locator allows visitors to confidentially search for mental health and substance addiction treatment facilities anywhere in the United States. SAMHSA also operates a 24-hour National Helpline for people looking for information and treatment referrals related to mental health and substance abuse disorders, and a 24-hour Suicide Prevention Lifeline for anyone experiencing suicidal thoughts.
  • Help for Mental Illness, from NIMH
    As part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) funds research on ways to prevent and treat mental disorders. Their website includes a resources page to find health care providers and treatment, locate clinical trials, and learn more about mental health.

HRSA DISCLAIMER

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-87) via grant H89HA00007.

This document was funded with 100% governmental sources. The information or content and conclusions are those of the Nevada Office of HIV/AIDS Part B Program and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

 

PHOTOGRAPH DISCLAIMER

The people in the photos on this web site are models and used for illustrative purposes only unless otherwise noted – no representation regarding HIV status is made and should not be inferred.

This site contains HIV or STD that may not be appropriate for all audiences.

Since HIV and other STD's are spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics. If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please exit this website.

The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program

 

  • The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (previously known as the Ryan White CARE Act) is a Federal program that funds services for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA).
  • Ryan White services are to be used only for those who cannot pay for the care they need and funds are to be used as the “payer of last resort”.
  • The legislation spells out who is eligible for services and describes how the money can be used.
  • Most Ryan White funds go to pay for medical and support services for PLWHA and their families.
  • The major goal of this program is to get PLWHA into care early and help them stay there and remain healthy.

 

The San Antonio Ryan White TGA Part A Program

  • Part A funds go to local areas that have been hit hardest by the HIV epidemic.
  • These areas are called eligible metropolitan areas (EMAs) or transitional grant areas (TGAs).
  • San Antonio is a TGA,  meaning it is a metropolitan area with between 1,000 and 1,999 new cases of AIDS reported in the past five years and at least 1,500 cumulative living cases of AIDS as of the most recent calendar year.
  • Part A money goes to the chief elected official (CEO) of the major city or county government in the EMA or TGA.
  • The CEO is legally the grantee, but usually chooses a department or other entity to manage the grant.
  • That entity is called the grantee,  and is responsible for ensuring that the grant funds are used correctly.
  •  The grantee works with the Part A planning council in making decisions about how to use the funds.

 

The Award Process

Each year Congress approves different amounts of funds for Ryan White programs, including Part A which is then divided into formula and supplemental funds.

  • EMA's or TGA's must submit a grant application to HAB/DSS each year to receive formula and supplemental Part A funds.
  • Grants are written by the Grantee and submitted each September.
  • EMA's or TGA's must submit a grant application to HAB/DSS each year to receive formula and supplemental Part A funds.
  • Grants are written by the Grantee and submitted each September.
  • The grant year or fiscal year runs from March 1st to February 28th each year.
  • The annual planning cycle, which the Planning Council operates on, is from September to August each year.